IATEFL 2015 | Marisa Constantinides: Evernote for teacher observation and teacher development | Workshop summary

A great summary of a presentation I did at IATEFL in 2015 – using new tools for teacher observation which also lead to self-observation and reflection.

Here are my original presentation slides on Slidebean – I am afraid that on the day of my second presentation at IATEFL (I did this one twice, once for the LT SIG and once for the main conference), slibean betrayed me and was completely down – so Olya’s summary is without my slides but with the tool itself

https://app.slidebean.com/embed/rtCrPpeNEc

Read on

ELT stories

Abstract: A tutor, colleague or supervisor with a notepad taking field notes during a lesson is a common sight on teacher development courses. In this talk, I want to show how the use of Evernote can make teacher observations more effective and create an impact that can last longer, leading teachers in training to further reflection and development. Twitter: @marisa_c; slides will are available on Marisa Constatinides’s slidebean. Video is the most reliable way to capture a lesson. There’s technology allowing to easily videotape the class, e.g. Swivel – the teacher is wearing a device, which allows the camera to follow them. But that’s very expensive. What are some cheap alternatives? A lot of observers take detailed notes of everything that happens, what the students and teachers are doing and saying – essentially, becoming a ‘human video’. Typical notes could have three parts: what happened / what you did well / what you…

View original post 594 more words

Upcoming webinars for educators | September – December 2016

For our Delta readers, a list of upcoming webinars, courtesy of Twitter friend Adi Rajan @adi_rajan

Immersivities

Have you attended any interesting webinars lately? I’ve been missing all the good stuff and turning up for the crap ones because let’s face it, it’s not all insights and epiphanies. Here are some webinars to keep you (hopefully) engaged till the end of the year. An * marks webinars that require registration.

iatefl.jpgLanguage 

View original post 816 more words

From Manager to Leader 

 

leadership
Reblogged from the iTDi blog 

by Bita Rezaei

Ask anyone and they will tell you there is a difference between being a manager and a leader but where the difference lies doesn’t seem to get beyond the quote “managers drive, leaders lead.”  History is filled with wisdom and case studies on the qualities of good leaders and effective leadership. Over the past few years there have been so many books, articles and blog posts published around the “how to’s” of becoming a good leader,  but as tempting as it may seem to call yourself one, it is not that easy.

It is said that management is career whereas leadership is a choice – a calling. Leaders get their power and authority not from their positions but from the trust people put in them. While at times you can tell a manager from miles away by a fair judgment of the dress code, way of speaking and mannerism, being a leader calls for another set of characteristics. To me, it’s about having that intangible charismatic component that some people have and some just don’t.

 

Continue Reading

 

Cambridge Delta: The Diagnostic Lesson

Very early on on the DELTA course, trainees are required to plan and teach a lesson which their tutor and other fellow trainees observe and evaluate.

Reflection on this lesson which takes account of the experience itself, the trainee’s own perceptions and the oral and written feedback received by the tutor and fellow trainees form the basis of a plan of action for the rest of Module 2 on the course.

At different points, it is this plan of action that the trainee has to look back on and track their own development during their course, take stock and work on areas which are felt to be in need of improvement.

Read Angelos’ blog post of how he sees this experience, its challenges and its benefits and think about your own diagnostic lessons.

It should be said that this seems to be a great way to go whether one is doing a Cambridge DELTA course or not and helps teachers to become reflective and to think of solutions which will keep improving their planning and their teaching.

Marisa Constantinides
Cambridge DELTA Course Tutor

Narratives of a TEFLer

WordItOut-word-cloud-518700

Planning a Delta diagnostic lesson is first and foremost a decision-making process. The answers to questions such as what to teach or how to teach it should be decided well in advance of the planning process. In this post, I will share the steps I followed while preparing for it.

A. The Purpose of The Lesson

Why is one doing a diagnostic lesson is a very important question to spend some time thinking about. In my view, such a lesson serves six purposes:

1. For the candidates to review, hone, and assess their practice in general.
2. For the candidates to review, hone, and assess their practice in relation to Delta-specific criteria.
3. For the candidates to gain experience teaching a group of students, most of whom they will teach again for at least one of their LSAs.
4. For the candidates to familiarize themselves with the reflective practice model…

View original post 480 more words

Rumour Has It

Should you be afraid of the rumours about following a DELTA course? There are those who enjoy frightening prospective candidates away from following this course. And yet, all those who have completed it report the benefits to their teaching, planning, as well as the career options open to them.

It is true that the course is demanding – but the skills acquired make it truly worth working for.

Enjoy Angelos’ post and let us know what you think

Marisa Constantinides

Narratives of a TEFLer

Cambridge Delta post

It has been a while since my latest blog post and… guess why? Well, the reason is no other than preparing for the 8-week Cambridge Delta intensive course at CELT Athens.

In the days/months to follow, I will be blogging about my experience as a Cambridge Delta candidate at CELT Athens. For now, though, I would just like to share with future -and present- candidates my only piece of advice: Do NOT read everything that exists online regarding the course!

If one googles the term ‘Cambridge Delta’, s/he might receive a couple of pages with official documents (which, by the way, are extremely useful) and tons of pages coming from every kind of source highlighting its ‘extreme difficulty.’

I am not saying or implying that the Cambridge Delta course is an easy one (far from it, actually!). However, the whole purpose of googling about it should not be to…

View original post 319 more words

Using Wiggio with our Cambridge DELTA Trainees

This year we started using a new communication platform for our online/blended DELTA courses, Wiggio. We already have  our DELTA wiki, a wiki  rich in resources, links, material, sample assignments and more, but felt we needed a kind of Social Network/Learning Management System that would allow us to communicate instantly and be rich in content features needed for our DELTA courses. 

We are very happy to have selected Wiggio. Below, I am reposting an interview which was just published on the Wiggio Blog a couple of days prior to this post. 

Read my comments there and try it out with your students yourself. 

Marisa Constantinides

June Wiggio Group: Cambridge DELTA Trainees

Screen Shot 2013-05-20 at 5.27.15 PM

This month, we connected with Wiggio user Marisa Constantinides.  She is using Wiggio to manage students in her online Teacher Education Courses for English Language Teachers.

Continue Reading 

 

 

How to make the most of your DELTA course

This is the summary of an #ELTchat which was written up by Chris Wilson who has himself just started following a DELTA course.

You can read the original chat transcript here and Chris’ summary on his blog.

On the 15/02/2013 teachers from across the world met to discuss my suggested topic “How to survive and make the most of your DELTA (or similar course)” A topic I had chosen as I am about to start my DELTA (having been persuaded on a previous #ELTChat) and having seen Sandy Millin reflect on her issues and struggles on her DELTA. Thankful the ever helpful ELTchat PLN came to the rescue!

Top Survival Tips

1) Get reading early

@Marisa_C shared this tip and it quickly lead to a sharing of recommended reading books, which I’ve added to an Amazon list.

@ShaunWilden later added that forming a reading group was a good idea to assist other trainees learning.

2) Build a Jargon list

@ShaunWilden commented on the large amount of Jargon in the DELTA and so recommended making a Jargon list. @TEFLerinha agreed and added that the Exam now asks you to define terms as well (although as @Shaznosel pointed out, you only get a few points for defining terms so don’t worry too much)

@SandyMillin shared her Quizlet group as a tool for learning DELTA jargon but @toulasklavou was more critical stating that learning terms by heart was useless and that it was much better and more effective to read and learn the terms in context.

3) Get assignments out of the way early

@TheTeacherJames shared this tip from his CELTA course. Of course (no pun intended), the DELTA has a different format from the CELTA with assignments not being part of Module one, Module two has five writing assignments and Module three has an extended assignment. So time management is still a big issue.

4) Develop a good note taking system

@Marisa_C Sshared that when she did her Diploma she used Large paper mindmaps and Note cards but now there are plenty of tools that make storing notes a lot easier. @ShaunWilden agreed but @Shaznosel said that she still uses paper mindmaps and note cards.

Some Of the curation tools that were recommended included Evernote (my favourite), One note (from Microsoft), diigo (Useful highlighting tools) or even a tool like Pintrest. In hindsight I noticed that no one mentioned an online mindmapping tool so i’d like to recommend Google Drive’s drawing feature or wallwisher.

Continue reading

Protected: What is lexis and how can we describe it?

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below: