The Learning Style Debate

Great post on this debate and David Petrie takes a stance with some very good arguments and a good review of existing literature. What do you think?

 

Make sure you click on “view the original” to read the rest of David’s blog post.

teflgeek

I am sceptical about learning styles.  Much is made of them, CELTA and DELTA trainees are required to learn about them and to plan their lessons taking into account activities that cater to the visual, auditory or kinaesthetic sensibilities of their students, or at least to show evidence of having intended to….  Personally, I don’t doubt that people learn in different ways or have different preferences for processing information, but what I’m not sure about and have yet to see any evidence confirming, is whether changing my teaching to cater for these various styles actually has a positive effect.  Which is why I was very interested to read Katie Lepi’s “The Myth of Learning Styles” on the Edudemic blog, which presents the arguments against.  The fantastic infographic from her piece is reproduced below.

teflgeek learning styles

The original learning styles model came from the work of David Kolb, who, in the…

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Exemptions and credits to DELTA holders on related MA level courses

Ofqual, the exams regulator of the UK government, has confirmed that Cambridge ESOL's Delta qualification for teachers is at the same level as a Master's degree or a professional diploma in the European Union. This is a result of Delta being placed at level 7 of the UK government’s Qualification and Credit Framework (QCF), making … Continue reading Exemptions and credits to DELTA holders on related MA level courses

The End

Scott Thornbury closes down his A-Z Blog with an insighful last post

Make sure you visit this blog often – not clear from last post if it will be taken down or not

An A-Z of ELT

So this is it, folks: I’m closing down the blog for the summer… and for good. After 3 years, 150 posts, nearly 7000 comments, and innumerable hits, visits, views, however you want to describe and count them, plus one e-book spin-off (but no sign of a second edition of An A-Z!), I think it’s time to call it a day.

But that’s not the end of blogging.  In the autumn (or in the spring, if that’s your orientation) I’ll be resuming with an altogether different theme and format, provisionally titled The (De-)Fossilization Diaries.  Watch this space!

At some point between now and then I’ll lock the comments on this blog, but it will hang around a little longer. If you think you might miss it if it suddenly disappeared, you could always buy the book! 😉

Meanwhile, thanks for following, commenting, subscribing, tweeting… I have so enjoyed hosting this…

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An interesting blog post discussing Ben Goldacre’s recent article in the Guardian and his thoughts on research for education.

Read Ben Goldacre’s article Bad Science here 

Watch his TED talk too

 

Related blog posts 

Evidence-informed policy and practice – we should welcome it, but also be realistic!

Research and Evidence in ELT  posted by Julia Moore after an #ELTchat we had on how teachers could be more involved in research – you can read the transcript of that chat here and summary will be posted soon as well.

And a post about all this on Ben Goldacre’s website 

Joe Kirby's blog

 

leech doctor

 The Doctor & The Leech

Long ago a travelling physician diagnosed fevers as due to an over-supply of blood, and prescribed leeches as a cure to reduce the excess. ‘Blood-letting’, he said, ‘clears the mind, strengthens the memory, dispels torpor, reduces anxiety and lengthens life.’ He treated many poorly people in this way as he travelled from town to town. Whenever the patients recovered he would boast about the great remedy of the leech. But strangely enough, when they died of their fever, he was never seen at the funerals, for he had already left town.

Cryptic, remote, irrelevant and unusable’, writes Tom Bennett on the Times Educational Supplement website: ‘why is so much research in education purest snake oil?’

In March, Ben Goldacre published a treatise on building evidence into education, a long-term aim I share. Dr Goldacre has hundreds of thousands…

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Demand High ELT – is it really something new?

The concept of 'demand high ELT' was first introduced at IATEFL Glasgow in 2012 in a talk by Jim Scrivener, in which he told the story of the long conversations with Adrian Underhill and how they both felt that they needed to redefine or reshape their beliefs/ideas in terms of good ELT practice. Here are … Continue reading Demand High ELT – is it really something new?