The Learning Style Debate

Great post on this debate and David Petrie takes a stance with some very good arguments and a good review of existing literature. What do you think?

 

Make sure you click on “view the original” to read the rest of David’s blog post.

teflgeek

I am sceptical about learning styles.  Much is made of them, CELTA and DELTA trainees are required to learn about them and to plan their lessons taking into account activities that cater to the visual, auditory or kinaesthetic sensibilities of their students, or at least to show evidence of having intended to….  Personally, I don’t doubt that people learn in different ways or have different preferences for processing information, but what I’m not sure about and have yet to see any evidence confirming, is whether changing my teaching to cater for these various styles actually has a positive effect.  Which is why I was very interested to read Katie Lepi’s “The Myth of Learning Styles” on the Edudemic blog, which presents the arguments against.  The fantastic infographic from her piece is reproduced below.

teflgeek learning styles

The original learning styles model came from the work of David Kolb, who, in the…

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Exemptions and credits to DELTA holders on related MA level courses

creditsOfqual, the exams regulator of the UK government, has confirmed that Cambridge ESOL’s Delta qualification for teachers is at the same level as a Master’s degree or a professional diploma in the European Union. This is a result of Delta being placed at level 7 of the UK government’s Qualification and Credit Framework (QCF), making it the only English language teaching diploma currently included at this level.

Welcoming this new recognition, Cambridge ESOL’s Chief Executive Dr Mike Milanovic says: “Teachers holding this qualification demonstrate a very high level of expertise indeed and we’re delighted by this acknowledgment from Ofqual. This reflects the quality standards associated with the Delta qualification which is great news for teachers and the millions of students around the world learning English.”

N.B. The DELTA on its own does not constitute an MA qualification but is considered to be at the same level, which makes holders eligible for exemptions, credits, and fast track options in a variety of UK based universities.  

The following UK institutions offer credits or exemptions to DELTA holders, for the courses listed. We make every attempt to keep this information up to date – however, applicants should always check with the institution, as they do change their requirements, and these may differ for individual applicants.

Please use Google to verify the information below and do leave a comment if you have information about other universities not included here – we have added total number of credits where this was available and easy to find from the university website.

Institution Courses with credits/exemptions Further information  Total Credits
Aston University MSc in Teaching English to Speakers of other Languages (TESOL)

MSc in Teaching English for Specific Purposes (TESP)·

MSc in Teaching English to Young Learners (TEYL)

MSc in Educational Management in TESOL (EMT)

Exemption from the Methodology module plus 20 credits toward an additional module  4 modules
Bath, University of MA ELT Fast track available: exemption of two core units (from total of 5).  5 core units
Bath Spa University MA/Teach TESOL Exemption from first semester equal to 60 credits  180 credits
Birkbeck, University of London MA TESOL

MA Language Teaching

30 credits
Bristol, University of MSc in TESOL 40 credits.
Bedfordshire, University of Applied Linguistics MA (TEFL) Exemption from assessed teaching practice (30 points)
Canterbury Christ Church MA TESOL Exemption from first two modules (40 credits).  5 modules
University of Derby Education MA DELTA holders offered up to 60 credits upon consultation
East London, University of MA English Language Teaching (ELT) Exemption from one 30-credit module
Edinburgh, University of MEd TESOL Students may request accreditation for prior learning for the core course in TESOL Methodology.2 core modules  6 core modules
Exeter University Med TESOL DELTA holders offered up to 60 credits  Link to info
Institute of Education, University of London MA Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages (campus-based) Exemption from one 30-credit optional module.  180 credits
King’s College London MA in ELT & Applied Linguistics (part-time programme only) Fast track option – exemption from one core module (Principles and Practice in ELT) and one option – 30 credits in total.  180 credits
Leeds Beckett University MA English Language Teaching 60 credit exemption   Direct entry to semester 2
Leicester, University of MA TESOL & Applied Linguistics (campus-based and distance learning versions) 30 credit exemption  6 modules
Northumbria University MA in Applied Linguistics forTESOL·       MA TESOL Exemptions of up to 3 modules, or 60 credits, equivalent  to 1/3 of the MA  180 credits
Nottingham, University of MA ELT distance Exemption of two core modules running from May to end of year (January start recommended)  40 points/credits
Open University, The Masters degree in Education (Applied Linguistics) 60 credits
Oxford Brookes University MA in Education One module only worth 20 credits  180 credits
Portsmouth, University of ·       MA Applied Linguistics and TESOL (both on site & distance modes) 30 credits at M-level.  180 credits
Reading, University of ·       MA in English Language Teaching Language Curriculum Design (10 credits) and one of: Written Language (20 credits), Spoken Language (20 credits), Language Testing Principles (20 credits). This equals a total credit transfer of 30 credits towards this 180-credit degree.  180 credits
Sheffield, University of MA Applied Linguistics Exemption from 15-credit core module on Language Teaching Methodology.  8 core modules
Sheffield Hallam MA TESOL 60 credits to DELTA holders (i.e. they are exempt from the Postgraduate Certificate, which forms the first part of the MA).  180 credits
York St John University MA English Language Teaching Exemption from 30-credit core module on Practical English Language Teaching
Warwick University MA ELT Exemption of 60 credits from an 180 credit course  Link to info

 


About the Author

MARISAMarisa Constantinides, Dip.RSA, M.A. App Ling

A teacher, teacher educator and materials writer, Marisa Constantinides is the head of CELT Athens, a teacher education centre established in 1993, She is responsible for the design and training on all courses including Cambridge CELTA and DELTA, face-2-face and online. Marisa has a strong presence in Social Networks, moderates #ELTchat, a weekly discussion on Twitter (recently nominated for an ELTons award in Innovation in Teaching Resources). Marisa maintains a number of blogs (TEFL Matters#ELTchatTeaching & Learning Languages, the DELTA course blogthe CELTA course blog). She has published materials for young learners as well as for B2 and C2 level classes.

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The End

Scott Thornbury closes down his A-Z Blog with an insighful last post

Make sure you visit this blog often – not clear from last post if it will be taken down or not

An A-Z of ELT

So this is it, folks: I’m closing down the blog for the summer… and for good. After 3 years, 150 posts, nearly 7000 comments, and innumerable hits, visits, views, however you want to describe and count them, plus one e-book spin-off (but no sign of a second edition of An A-Z!), I think it’s time to call it a day.

But that’s not the end of blogging.  In the autumn (or in the spring, if that’s your orientation) I’ll be resuming with an altogether different theme and format, provisionally titled The (De-)Fossilization Diaries.  Watch this space!

At some point between now and then I’ll lock the comments on this blog, but it will hang around a little longer. If you think you might miss it if it suddenly disappeared, you could always buy the book! 😉

Meanwhile, thanks for following, commenting, subscribing, tweeting… I have so enjoyed hosting this…

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An interesting blog post discussing Ben Goldacre’s recent article in the Guardian and his thoughts on research for education.

Read Ben Goldacre’s article Bad Science here 

Watch his TED talk too

 

Related blog posts 

Evidence-informed policy and practice – we should welcome it, but also be realistic!

Research and Evidence in ELT  posted by Julia Moore after an #ELTchat we had on how teachers could be more involved in research – you can read the transcript of that chat here and summary will be posted soon as well.

And a post about all this on Ben Goldacre’s website 

Pragmatic Education

 

leech doctor

 The Doctor & The Leech

Long ago a travelling physician diagnosed fevers as due to an over-supply of blood, and prescribed leeches as a cure to reduce the excess. ‘Blood-letting’, he said, ‘clears the mind, strengthens the memory, dispels torpor, reduces anxiety and lengthens life.’ He treated many poorly people in this way as he travelled from town to town. Whenever the patients recovered he would boast about the great remedy of the leech. But strangely enough, when they died of their fever, he was never seen at the funerals, for he had already left town.

Cryptic, remote, irrelevant and unusable’, writes Tom Bennett on the Times Educational Supplement website: ‘why is so much research in education purest snake oil?’

In March, Ben Goldacre published a treatise on building evidence into education, a long-term aim I share. Dr Goldacre has hundreds of thousands…

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Demand High ELT – is it really something new?

The concept of ‘demand high ELT’ was first introduced at IATEFL Glasgow in 2012 in a talk by Jim Scrivener, in which he told the story of the long conversations with Adrian Underhill and how they both felt that they needed to redefine or reshape their beliefs/ideas in terms of good ELT practice.

Here are his slides from that talk

Here you can watch a recent presentation by Jim Scrivener himself at the IH DOS conference in 2013
Here is also a link to an article in the Guardian Weekly in which they explain all

As expected when speakers/authors of their calibre come up with some new claim, there was a lot of interest in the whole notion/angle, and the talk has been repeated since several times at conferences around the world.

Jim Scrivener & Adrian Underhill also created a related blog – Demand High ELT  in which they post news, observation tasks and slides or interview and posts.

An interesting post which went up recently looks at demand high ELT as a possible topic for a Module 2 Experimental Assignment – part of your PDA.

Here is the title with the link Doing Delta Module Two? Could Demand-High be your Alternative Practice?

#ELTchat discussion on this topic

Recently, on the 16th of January, I moderated an #ELTchat discussion on Twitter with the title

“How does Demand High Teaching differ from Dogme (if at all)” 

The discussion was quite lively and joined even by Jim Scrivener himself – you can read the transcript of our conversation here  and Carolyn Kerr’s great summary here

Demand High and Dogme – brothers in arms or distant cousins?

Everyone, including Mr Scrivener, was pretty thrilled with the attention to DHELT and Carolyn’s summary was also featured in the DHELT blog by the two authors.

An #ELTchat summary is, of course, always useful to read but, oftentimes, may also reflect the writer’s attitude, so it’s a good idea to have a look at the actual tweets

Enter Jeremy Harmer

Today Jeremy Harmer published a blog post which has had the blogosphere wondering if there will be a tiif or what….

Title

Does reading (and learning a language) require two brains?

Jeremy reports some research which found different parts of the brain active during pleasure reading and language work and started off a discussion which goes into Krashen and further questions a number of things, amongst which demand high ELT which he calls ‘somewhat ramshackle’ …. hmm

I am not sure the research Jeremy quotes has much to do with whether language analysis or conscious learning is more or less effective than pleasure reading; he seems to think it does prove something – but there your are, this is what the discussion is all about.

Comments have already been added by Scott Thornbury and others, and, soon, I expect, by Jim Scrivener who very humorously put out the following tweettweet

What do YOU think?

We can discuss Mr Harmer’s claim about this research in a different post/thread, but for now, I would like you to reflect on demand high ELT.

Do you think it a new approach?

Do you think it’s something worth considering?

Is it a new method?

Is it a new attitude?

Have you noticed any ‘demand low ELT’ in your locale?

Please add your comments below

 

Related Posts

https://canlloparot.wordpress.com/2015/01/30/demand-high-another-dud-product/

http://www.mikejharrison.com/2015/02/beware-spreading-good-word-elt/

https://cgoodey.wordpress.com/2015/02/01/the-way/