Teacher, hoping to be a manager?

Teacher, hoping to be a Manager?   Or are you already a manager and learnt how to run your institution on the job? Like many of us, you probably thought there wasn’t much to running a school.

But running a school is a very special kind of management and requires special skills. No wonder teachers often do not show a preference for managers who have no background in education and no experience of classroom teaching.

Whichever direction you are coming from, an organised course on ELT Management, especially one which is part of the Cambridge Diploma and so clearly connected with a background in teaching and understanding of sound pedagogical principles may well turn your career around and give you the opportunity to develop it in a different way.

Enter the Cambridge Delta ELT Management Course

ELTM-Poster-2

ELT Management Module 3 Course

Delivered entirely online – you can log in and complete tasks whenever you have free time

 

Join this 8-week online course to learn all about what it takes to be a manager in a Language Teaching Operation.

Cambridge Assessment offers this opportunity to Delta candidates who wish to move from being a teacher to being a manager. More and more institutions are becoming aware of this qualification and are showing a preference for teachers who also have management potential.

The course is assessed via an extended assignment on one of the following specialisms listed below:

  • Academic Management
  • Human Resources Management (HRM)
  • Customer Service
  • Marketing

In order to participate you must be eligible to be a Delta candidate (more here).

In addition you must

– be able to do academic research
– be able to write academic English
– have access to a language teaching operation (LTO) e.g. a language school or institution
– have access to data/information which will be useful to their project.

In order to apply, please download the application form from this link and send to info@celt.edu.gr

Tuition is 700 euros inclusive of Cambridge assessment fees.

Payment details will be sent to candidates upon acceptance to the course.

Watch an interview with a recent successful candidate

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

The course is asynchronous and you are not required to attend at a specific time.

Candidates who aim to obtain the Cambridge Certificate are required to write a 4,500 word assignment on one of the four areas mentioned earlier.

Submission of assignments is  either in early June or early December.

Module 3 ELT Management – Interview with a recent candidate

The interview was suggested by Liam who really liked the format of the course and wanted to help us spread this information.

His promised blog post will appear on this very same page in a few weeks.

leadership

Meanwhile, here is what he said about our course

 

Course Design for 9-10 year old learners in Greece

A Module 3 Assignment on Teaching Young Learners

na_yl This is is the first of a series of Module 3 assignments which we have decided to share through this blog, with the candidate’s permission, of course.

Course Design for 9-10 year old learners in Greece

The  project was written by Sharon Noseley and received a Merit Grade Especially interesting for the YL teacher:

  • the way Sharon did her needs analysis
  • the design of her syllabus

You can download the main assignment and the appendices directly from this blog. GR108_011_noseley_YL_0612 GR108_011_Delta3_noseley_appendices

About the Author

sharonSharon Noseley was a YL teacher for a number of years in Greece. She is now an EAP teacher in the UK at the De Montfort University Leicester (DMU). She tweets as  @shazno on Twitter and you can find her as  Sharon-Nosely-Kallandzhs on Facebook Her blog is TEFL Experiences 

How not to design a syllabus

A timely blog post for those of you thinking about your Module 3 Assignments

 

 

The Steve Brown Blog

After many years of working in this business (and yes it is a business), I am still frequently frustrated by a lack of awareness of good practice when it comes to language programme design. Different institutions do it in different ways, but not that many (in my experience) do it well. In this post I’m going to describe a few popular approaches to syllabus design and tell you what’s wrong with them. In a subsequent post I’ll go on to give some alternative suggestions on what principles to adopt when designing or developing a curriculum for language learning.

 

Bad syllabus No. 1: The global coursebook

Coursebooks look amazing – they have great pictures, they appear to be well-organised, and they come with all sorts of add-ons – workbook, CD-Rom, DVD, website, references to dictionaries by the same publisher etc. However, I’ve said it before, I’m saying it now…

View original post 1,401 more words

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