Helping Intermediate Learners Better Understand Cohesion

Publishing the first of a series of assignments written by past DELTA trainees (with their permission, of course!) This one was submitted for the external assessment and although we were not informed of the specific grade, this confirmed the candidate's overall very high grade.

Interruptions | A meeting skills activity

Great post and idea for a speaking skills lesson

Cambridge Delta: The Diagnostic Lesson

Very early on on the DELTA course, trainees are required to plan and teach a lesson which their tutor and other fellow trainees observe and evaluate. Reflection on this lesson which takes account of the experience itself, the trainee's own perceptions and the oral and written feedback received by the tutor and fellow trainees form … Continue reading Cambridge Delta: The Diagnostic Lesson

Rumour Has It

Should you be afraid of the rumours about following a DELTA course? There are those who enjoy frightening prospective candidates away from following this course. And yet, all those who have completed it report the benefits to their teaching, planning, as well as the career options open to them. It is true that the course … Continue reading Rumour Has It

Face-to-Face Intensive or Online/Blended Part Time Cambridge DELTA Course?  

Cambridge DELTA Courses - Soon to Begin Face-to-Face Intensive or Online/Blended Part Time Cambridge DELTA Course? Which mode is the best one for you?  There is still time to apply for one of our fall courses   Face-to-Face?  Blended? Our 8-week face-to-face course in Athens is your best option if you are the type of person … Continue reading Face-to-Face Intensive or Online/Blended Part Time Cambridge DELTA Course?  

Course Design for 9-10 year old learners in Greece

A Module 3 Assignment on Teaching Young Learners This is is the first of a series of Module 3 assignments which we have decided to share through this blog, with the candidate's permission, of course. Course Design for 9-10 year old learners in Greece The  project was written by Sharon Noseley and received a Merit … Continue reading Course Design for 9-10 year old learners in Greece

How not to design a syllabus

A timely blog post for those of you thinking about your Module 3 Assignments

 

 

The Steve Brown Blog

After many years of working in this business (and yes it is a business), I am still frequently frustrated by a lack of awareness of good practice when it comes to language programme design. Different institutions do it in different ways, but not that many (in my experience) do it well. In this post I’m going to describe a few popular approaches to syllabus design and tell you what’s wrong with them. In a subsequent post I’ll go on to give some alternative suggestions on what principles to adopt when designing or developing a curriculum for language learning.

 

Bad syllabus No. 1: The global coursebook

Coursebooks look amazing – they have great pictures, they appear to be well-organised, and they come with all sorts of add-ons – workbook, CD-Rom, DVD, website, references to dictionaries by the same publisher etc. However, I’ve said it before, I’m saying it now…

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The Learning Style Debate

Great post on this debate and David Petrie takes a stance with some very good arguments and a good review of existing literature. What do you think?

 

Make sure you click on “view the original” to read the rest of David’s blog post.

teflgeek

I am sceptical about learning styles.  Much is made of them, CELTA and DELTA trainees are required to learn about them and to plan their lessons taking into account activities that cater to the visual, auditory or kinaesthetic sensibilities of their students, or at least to show evidence of having intended to….  Personally, I don’t doubt that people learn in different ways or have different preferences for processing information, but what I’m not sure about and have yet to see any evidence confirming, is whether changing my teaching to cater for these various styles actually has a positive effect.  Which is why I was very interested to read Katie Lepi’s “The Myth of Learning Styles” on the Edudemic blog, which presents the arguments against.  The fantastic infographic from her piece is reproduced below.

teflgeek learning styles

The original learning styles model came from the work of David Kolb, who, in the…

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